[Blueboard] Research on wellness and illnes, transport history, Burmese democratization

acas at admu.edu.ph acas at admu.edu.ph
Mon Mar 4 14:06:21 PHT 2013


The Asian Studies Association of the Philippines (Asia-Phil) in  
cooperation with the Ateneo Center for Asian Studies (ACAS) cordially  
invites you to the presentation of preliminary research findings by  
three scholars.

Date: March 7 (Thursday)
Time: 3:30 to 6:20 p.m.
Venue: LH 306 (Third floor, Ricardo and Dr. Rosita Leong Hall)

These scholars are the successful recipients of research grants from  
Asia-Phil for 2012-2013.

Program:

3:30 to 4:20: Francisco A. Magno, Ph.D. (faculty, De La Salle
University), “Democratization in Burma: The role of diaspora communities”

4:30 to 5:20: Arnel E. Joven, Ph.D. (faculty, University of Asia and  
the Pacific), “Perceptions of wellness and illness in urban East Asia:  
A survey of culture-based notions of health in Japan.”

5:30 to 6:20: Michael D. Pante (faculty, Ateneo de Manila University),  
“The motor vehicle as metaphor: Viewing modern Singapore through its  
transport history”

Abstracts:

Francisco A. Magno, Ph.D. (faculty, De La Salle University),  
“Democratization in Burma: The role of diaspora communities”

The government of Burma was heavily controlled by the military in the  
post-colonial period until the opening up of democratic space  
following the elections in 2010. Why is democratization happening  
despite the strong efforts of the military to monopolize power over  
the last six decades? What are the factors that are shaping the  
political transition in Burma? Why is the democratic space widening in  
Burma despite the serious efforts by the state to control civil  
society and information exchange? One of the key factors that are  
driving change is the diaspora communities that are spread out in  
various parts of the world. It is interesting to assess how these  
exiled communities actually helped and contributed in the  
democratization process of the country, and to find out the tools and  
avenues through which such efforts are channeled. Information and  
communications technology (ICT) has becomes a potent weapon of civil  
society, including those operating inside the country and the network  
of diaspora communities engaged in the collaborative process to foster  
democratization.

Arnel E. Joven, Ph.D. (faculty, University of Asia and the Pacific),  
“Perceptions of wellness and illness in urban East Asia: A survey of  
culture-based notions of health in Japan.”

This research looks at how Japanese living in the cities view health  
and illness.  It seems apparent that Japanese urbanites look at their  
bodies in light of western scientific medicine.  However, East Asian  
perspective on medicine and disease is still predominantly determined  
by traditional Chinese medicine and indigenous cosmological models.   
This study seeks to identify the extent of how these perspectives are  
culture-bound and how such is manifested in the daily experiences of  
wellness and/or illness among urban Japanese.  In this regard, these  
threads are identified through analysis of extensive case studies in  
Nagoya and Tokyo.  The choice of the two cities presents a wider scope  
of analysis as well as provides geographic points of political,  
economic, and cultural comparison.

Michael D. Pante (faculty, Ateneo de Manila University), “The motor  
vehicle as metaphor: Viewing modern Singapore through its transport  
history”

	This research project traces the historical development of motor  
vehicle transportation in Singapore throughout the twentieth century.  
It begins with an investigation of Singapore’s changing urban  
transport system towards the end of the nineteenth century that saw  
the introduction of the automobile into the city-state. In the early  
twentieth century, the motor vehicle became a symbol of Western  
imperialism: as the port of Singapore became the world’s largest  
supplier of rubber for the manufacture of tires, the city also became  
an important consumer of the end product in the form of motor  
vehicles. The aftermath of the Second World War, however, led to  
important changes. Japan’s postwar “economic miracle” became visible  
in the shift in motor vehicle consumption in Singapore: Fords and  
Rovers took the backseat behind the new industry leaders Toyota and  
Nissan. As the country joined the community of independent nations in  
1965 and became one of the so-called Newly Industrialized Countries of  
Asia in the 1970s, the motor vehicle industry also took center stage  
in the country’s economic strategy of Import-Substitution  
Industrialization. Given these parallel shifts, it can be argued that  
the trajectory of the motor vehicle industry in the twentieth century  
mirrored the course of Singapore’s modern history.

Please confirm attendance through acas at admu.edu.ph









-- 
Lydia N. Yu-Jose, Ph.D.
Executive Director

Ateneo Center for Asian Studies
2/F Ricardo & Dr. Rosita Leong Hall,
Loyola Heights, Quezon City, 1108
Tel: (632) 426-6001 loc. 5285/5286; (632) 926-4202
Office hours: Monday to Friday, 1:00-5:00 pm
Email: acas at admu.edu.ph
URL: http://ateneo.edu/ls/soss/acas

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