[Blueboard] Roundtable Discussion on "Filipino Americans: Their Identity and Political Struggles"

Department of English doe at admu.edu.ph
Mon Nov 9 10:55:04 PHT 2009


                        The Department of English presents

                      the first of its Critical American and
                     Filipino/Asian American Studies Seminars

                       ?Filipino Americans: Their Identity
                            and Political Struggles?

                                      by
                                Marcelo Estrada
            San Francisco School of Lacanian Psychoanalysis (USA)

                         12 November 2009, 12nn-130pm
                       English Department Faculty Lounge


The topic of this short seminar is: ?Filipino-Americans, their  
identity and their political struggles.? We will take this as an  
opportunity to discuss identity-formation and then problematize this  
identity ?Filipino-Americans,? their many forms of struggles, or  
rather their forms of discontent. To an academic audience, this is  
nothing new, of course; there are plenty of discussions of this same  
topic by writers and researchers coming from the U.S., especially  
those of Filipino ancestry. What is offered by this seminar is a  
Lacanian perspective. We will see if there is something productive in  
looking at this topic using Lacanian concepts. We will discuss  
Lacanian concepts of the Symbolic, Imaginary and Real, and in the  
process we will also cover specific notions such as loss and lack,  
desire and symptom formations and explore how they may have some  
bearings on the topic of  identity formations, and in this case on the  
identity ?Filipino-American?. Despite shortness of time, we will  
encourage the audience, especially those who have had some reading of  
Lacan (or at least of some references on this theorist in secondary  
readings) to ask their questions and engage the guest seminar leader  
in a productive dialogue.


BIONOTE

Marcelo Estrada is a practicing Lacanian psychoanalyst based in the  
San Francisco-Bay Area.  He is a founding member of the San Francisco  
School of Lacanian Psychoanalysis, founded by his analyst and teacher  
Andre Patsalides, an analysand and student of Jacques Lacan. He  
continues to teach Lacanian and Freudian psychoanalysis at the School  
to psychologists, psychiatrists, analysts from other schools and  
students from other disciplines who happen to be interested in  
psychoanalysis. Before training as an analyst, he also had training in  
psychology and the humanities and had long experience in community  
mental health serving the immigrant and refugee populations in the  
SF-Bay Area, California (USA).


The Critical American and Filipino/Asian American Studies Seminars  
Project is co-directed by Dr. Lulu Torres-Reyes (Chair) and Prof.  
Oscar Campomanes (Coordinator of Research) of the English Department.  
Primarily an initiative in departmental faculty development in the  
area of discretely-focused and critical Americanist research, this  
Project recognizes the cutting edge and now globalizing American  
Studies field, especially its exciting and growing subfields of  
Filipino/Asian American Studies, and seeks to address their continuing  
institutional neglect by leading Philippine universities. The seminars  
in topics or works of particular interest and featuring visiting or  
local Americanist scholars and writers will be relatively unstructured  
and purposely exploratory to allow for a catholicity of interests and  
a plurality of transdisciplinary approaches. Although internal to the  
English department, the seminars shall however allot additional but  
limited spaces to interested students and faculty from other programs  
or other institutions. Contact Oscar Campomanes  
(ocampomanes at ateneo.edu) or Francis Sollano (francissollano at yahoo.com)  
for more details.


-- 
Department of English
School of Humanities
Ateneo de Manila University
Katipunan Avenue, Loyola Heights,
Quezon City 1108
Tel. no.: 426-6001 local 5310/5311
Telefax: 426-6201

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